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Where To Lift a Pint On St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner, and we don’t know a soul who doesn’t crave a Guinness or a bite or two of bangers and mash on March the 17th. Lucky for us, there are some authentic, decades-old Irish pubs right here that will bring you back to the old country.

The Landmark Tavern has been serving up shepherd’s pie on the far west side since 1868. A former speakeasy and dock worker’s saloon maintains it’s old-world vibe with a long mahogany bar and tin ceilings. Start off the meal with a 15-year-old Dalwhinnie whiskey and wrap it up with a Nutty Irishman (Bailey’s Irish Cream and Frangelico hazelnut liqueur). Have we mentioned that their scotch eggs are to die for? Well, we just did.

The Peter McManus Cafe originally opened in Hell’s Kitchen in 1911 and moved to its current spot in Chelsea in the 30s. It’s touted as the oldest family-run bar in New York City; the owner’s great-grandson mans the bar these days. Grab a pint of Bass and chow down on one of their mouth-watering burgers. (We know, we know…burgers aren’t Irish but damn these are good!) The Tiffany stained glass cabinets and wooden phone booths will bring you way back in time.

Gramercy Park is home to Molly’s Pub, which was designed to resemble an illicit Irish shebeen (bar) from the 1950s. Sawdust floors, low ceilings, and a wood-burning fire create that atmosphere, and the  Irish stew and the corned beef and cabbage seal the deal. Wash them down with a pint of Smithwick’s or Harp. Yes!

The grandaddy of them all is McSorley’s Old Ale House. They claim to have opened in 1854 and who are we to argue? John Lennon, Woody Guthrie, and even Abe Lincoln have all lifted a pint or two inside its doors. Beware, as there are only two beers served here: McSorley’s light and dark house ale, and the food is nothing to write home about. But the interior hasn’t changed in a hundred years and the soul of the joint shines brightly.

Image via Marcela/Flickr