Cherry Blossoms Are (Almost) Here

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Little darlings, it’s been a long, cold lonely winner, but now the cherry blossom trees are thisclose to blooming in our parks. Hooray!

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden reports that its first tree is starting to blossom. The BBG updates a map on the buds’ progress regularly, so you can plan the best time to visit.

Central Park also reportedly has a few blooms. The trees are located by the Delacorte Theater, on the southeast edge of the Great Lawn, the Reservoir, the Ramble and Bethesda Terrace.

And the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx also plays host to the Spring beauties.

FYI, you can expect the season to last about five weeks, so start planning now!

 

Five Reasons To Visit New York City In April

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April brings a little something for everyone. Here’s why you should come and stay with us next month:

1. In just a few weeks, the cherry blossoms will be in bloom. Central Park and the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens are key viewing spots, but our own Washington Square Park has its fair share of the springtime-announcing buds.

2. The Tribeca Film Festival. This year it runs from April 16th through the 27th and includes free community events like the Tribeca Drive-In, which screens family-friendly movies like Mary Poppins and Splash outdoor at Waterfront Plaza.

3. It’s opening season for baseball fans! The Yankees toss out the first ball on April 1, while the Mets get a head start on March 31st.

4. Car lovers can check out the New York International Auto Show from the 18th through the 27th. Visitors can drool over the fancy cars with no alternate side of the street parking issues to worry about.

5. The average daily temperature is about 60 degrees….oh-so-perfect for exploring the city.

Happy First Day Of Spring!

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It’s finally here, and this is–hands down–the best season to visit New York City. The locals are slowly emerging from their apartment caves. You’re not stuffing yourself and that bulky down coat into 10 inches of subway seat. Those boxy wind fortresses are slowly coming down from store fronts; gloves and scarves are being thrown into storage.

It’s going to be 54 degrees today in the city, people. I feel like Mother Nature is wagging a finger at us, saying, “See? I told you it was going to come!”

So shed a few layers and make a beeline out of your apartment or hotel. Here are a few tips on experiencing the best of what the city has to offer at this time of year:

Ride a bike up the Hudson River to the Little Red Lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge. The lighthouse was made famous by the 1942 children’s book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, by Hildegarde Swift. Stop at the 79th Street Boat Basin Cafe for a beer and a burger along the way.

Head to a farmer’s market, a flea market or a street fair. Who cares if you buy anything? That’s not the point.

Check out the spring blooms on the High Line. Cherry blossoms, geraniums, tulips, and crocuses, oh my! Grab a Mexican chocolate ice pop from La Newyorkina or a brisket sandwich from Delaney Barbecue’s Smokeline to nosh on during your stroll.

Savor these extra hours of sunlight by sipping a cocktail outdoors at sunset.

Have a picnic!  Really, any park will do. Just grab a sandwich and people-watch, like all New Yorkers do. In fact, North Square can provide handy to-go picnic lunches to nibble across the street in Washington Square Park.

And finally, come visit us! We’re looking forward to seeing you!

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Is A Comin’

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In eight days, to be exact. We got a little taste of warmer weather yesterday and today. (Currently it’s 55 degrees.) So it’s all uphill from here, folks. A little taste of the good things to come:

Come and stay with us when the cherry blossoms are in bloom. We can’t wait!

 

Grab Your Sleds!

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So you’re in the city, it’s crazy cold and Mama Nature has just dumped a foot of the white stuff on the ground. What do you do?

Get thee a sled! Here are a few of the best slopes to whoosh down in our parks:

Central Park: Pilgrim Hill, which you’ll find if you enter at 72nd and 5th, is the most popular spot. But be prepared for crowds. The tiniest sledders would probably be better off at Cedar Hill, at Fifth Avenue between 76th and 79th Streets.

Riverside Park: Thrill-seekers will love the steep slope at Riverside and 91st Street–often referred to as “Suicide Hill”. Hay bales situated at the bottom help cushion the blow. (There’s also another great hill in the park by 103rd Street.)

Morningside Park: Head up to the hill at Morningside Drive and 115th Street and hang with the Columbia University kids. We used to use cafeteria trays back in the day–do you suppose they still do? (My guess is that some things never change.)

Enjoy the snow day!

So You're Visiting New York City On Thanksgiving Day

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What’s there to do? Is anything open?

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Of course, there’s the parade. That’s a no-brainer for some folks, but not for everyone. Fear not…there’s plenty of other ways to spend the holiday here:

Go ice skating! It’s cold enough but not so frigid that you’ll secretly hate whomever came up with that stupid idea to strap on blades and swoosh around on ice when it’s -30 degrees outside. The Wollman and Lasker Rinks in Central Park, The Bank of America Winter Village in Bryant Park, the Riverbank State Park uptown and Rockefeller Center rinks are all welcoming skaters on Thursday.

Take the kids (or adults) to the Central Park Zoo. Check out the Sea Lions, Red Panda or the oh-so-creepy-looking Emerald Tree Boa.

Speaking of Central Park, all of our city parks are open. Spend an afternoon wandering through Riverside, Prospect or any other green public space soaking up the late autumn sun.

And residents and visitors alike can pay their thanks and good fortune forward by volunteering with groups like God’s Love We Deliver, who cook up and transport delicious meals to those who are too ill or incapacitated to cook themselves. Or Citymeals-on-Wheels, which provide at-home nourishment to the elderly.

And you know that you can have a fine feast with us, right?

However you plan to spend your day, have a wonderful one.

Lots of love from your friends at the Washington Square Hotel! xxoo

Jazz & Colors

JD Allen Quartet @ Olmsted Bed on the Mall4- Jazz & Colors Central Park (Sat 11 10 12)

Looking for something fun–and free–to do this weekend? Tomorrow, the New York City Parks Dept., Central Park Conservancy and Brooklyn Bowl are putting on the second annual Jazz & Colors–a free musical experience featuring thirty–count ‘em, thirty–jazz ensembles performing at various locations right snack in the middle of the beautiful fall foliage in Central Park.

The lineup has Buy levitra lowest prices something for everyone, from small combos to big bands. The location is…well, all over the park. All thirty bands will play perform the same compositions scattered at different locations from Midtown to Harlem. A first set will be played from noon to 1:30. Musicians will take a break until 2 p.m., when they’ll play a second set and encores until 4 p.m.

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So what does the set list look like? The first set will include jazz standards like Duke Ellington’s Caravan, Miles Davis’ So What and Dizzy Gillespie’s A Night In Tunisia.

The second set will highlight songs about specific cities–like Gil Evans’ Las Vegas Tango, Gershwin’s A Foggy Day In London and Billy Strayhorn’s Take The A Train. (How could we have a festival without including A Train, people? I mean, seriously.) Remember, each band will simultaneously perform the same exact songs, allowing folks to hear unique interpretations of the same compositions as they explore Central Park. 

So who will be there? Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra, for one. Drummer and percussionist Kahlil Kwame Bell and Frank London’s Klezmer Brass All-Stars. And Duane Eubanks–a great trumpeter coming out of the infamous Eubanks family, will be making a return appearance.

To get more info and get a map of who’s playing where, click here.

 


 

 

 

 

Bryant Park Jugglers

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Ever want to learn how to juggle?

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Head to midtown around lunch time and catch the Bryant Park Jugglers and they’ll give you a lesson.

The group loves to teach the ancient art of juggling: Egyptian tomb drawings indicate juggling goes back to 1700 B.C. (Who knew?) They’ve been helping folks sharpen their physical coordination and dexterity since 2009. Oh–and it’s free. And, yeah, it’s fun.

The jugglers convene daily Monday through Thursday from 12 – 1, Friday 1 – 3, and a special after work class on viagra cheapest price Tuesday evenings from 5:30 – 7:30PM

Check out their blog or their twitter page for updates.

 

Labor Day Weekend Happenings

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There’s something for everybody in the city this upcoming holiday weekend, so read on…

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For music heads: Head out to Randall’s Island Friday, Saturday or Sunday for the fifth Electric Zoo music festival. In the biggest electronic dance music festival in the city, with both superstar DJs and underground up-and-comers entertaining you on five separate stages on the island. Day passes start at $139.

For those into good old-fashioned family fun: The Richmond County Fair in Staten Island runs on Saturday from 11 am to 6 pm. Expect music, dance workshops, pie and hot dog eating contests, magic, pony rides and arts and crafts. Kids can check out farm animals while adults may be into the classic car exhibition. Adults are $16, Seniors $11 and kids shorter than 30″ are free.

For art fans: the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit is right in our own backyard on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Fine artists and craft artisans from the New York metropolitan area, the nation and the world are showcased. (FYI, if you don’t catch it this week, it’s running the next weekend as well.)

For one-wheel enthusiasts and the people who are fascinated by them (i.e. me): The NYC Unicycle Festival takes place on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. On Friday, cyclists can enjoy a 13 mile unicycle ride through Brooklyn. Saturday and Sunday are perfect for spectators, where from 12 pm cialis pharmacy to 5 pm on Governor’s Island, folks can watch competitions, exhibitions, sports (unicycle basketball and hockey…who knew?) amid other craziness. If you’re daring (and have better-than-average balance) you can even try it yourself.

For absolutely everyone who loves great music, colorful costumes and a good time: The West Indian American Day Parade on Monday from 11 to 6 at Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn. Chow down on Caribbean food and drink, shop for jewelry, arts and crafts and colorful apparel. And dance! Everyone must dance! It’s Carnival, right?

And of course, for tennis nuts, there’s always the US Open, which I told you about earlier.

Enjoy your three day weekend!

Summer Streets

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Nope, it’s not a new Springsteen song. Summer Streets is an annual event buy viagra 100mg in which almost seven miles of city streets are closed to cars, trucks and buses, and open to humans who want to bike, play, unicyle, gallop–or, hell, walk on their hands if they want to–up the avenue.

Billed as, “part bike tour, part biking tour and part block party,” Park Avenue and connecting streets are closed between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m. on August 3rd, 10th and 17th. Six rest stops are provided along the route, where a bunch of activities and performances will take place.

You can work out with trainers at the Astor Place rest stop, scale a rock climbing wall at the Soho rest stop or, if you have a death wish, try out a zip line at the Foley Square one.

In addition, the Park Avenue tunnel will be open to pedestrians for the first time ever. (You know that little tunnel on Park between 33rd and 40th by Grand Central? The one that gives you a cheap thrill when your cab speeds seven blocks through midtown without stopping once? That one.) Inside will be Voice Tunnel, an interactive light and sound installation by Mexican-Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. 360 theatrical spotlights that produce glimmering arches of light along the tunnel’s walls and ceiling. Participants will be able to influence the intensity of each light by speaking into a special intercom at the tunnel’s center which records their voice and loops it. Louder speech will increase the lights’ brightness proportionally, creating a Morse-like code of flashes throughout the tunnel.

So next month, hop, skip and jump to your heart’s content up the avenue with no chance of getting hit by a car. I know I will.